Tag Archives: artist

Secret #2

Making of The Black Horse and His Eye

In the beginning of the making of the Black Horse the difficulty was nearly so much that I felt I would give up at any time.  There are 40 horses overlapped, one upon the other in search of the horse in my mind, within my imagination.  I have learned that the 40 horses are those of battle, my battle in learning to paint a horse.  Even now as he nears completion, he is not the original horse in my mind, the one turned more toward the viewer with flared nostrils filled with morning dew breathing the crisp fog when hot energetic air meets the cooled air of the morning.  The difficulty is mainly in my deficit regarding painting a horse. As an “artist” I find myself unprepared although I have imprinted images of some of the most magnificent horses in the world within my own mind.  One day the virtual world will bring what is in the mind to canvas but until that day it is the hand which projects what rest within the mind’s eye.

You have heard me rant about time being the enemy which is an obsession of mine but in this case, time helped me to see the error of my ways.  In the moments of time, while I looked relentlessly at the horse, I began to see that not only is he a main focal point of the entire painting, but also that his eye was placed awkwardly and anatomically wrong in the painting.   Oddly enough over the years, no one else had noticed it either, or if they did they did not dare speak of it.  Artist respect may have played a significant role in no one mentioning what they saw or prehaps didn’t see at all.  As many photos and live horses I had looked at, somehow I did not see it either.  There was a specific plan for that eye for that past couple of years and that could have easily pulled my attention away from it until the day I finally brought to life the image of the secret I had planned.  As Mona Lisa is known from being DaVinci in feminine form, the eye is mine.

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The Journal of Dreams 03/15/2010

Pigment (Green) Tool of the Painting (Chlorophyll)

Making pigment is often times a difficult task.  In drying berries and other live things, it is important to slowly dry them to preserve the color.  Grass makes for a brilliant green-yellow pigment and the reason for that is its Chlorophyll which is a magnificent component of plants in the way it interacts with light to create energy…the energy for life.  The green color of Chlorophyll stains (like the Tide detergent commercial where kids have grass stains on their knees), and is very difficult, if not impossible to remove.  This is a good thing for the making of pigment.

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Due to the staining properties and my abode being rented, I opted the purchasing of concentrated Chlorophyll in an easy to disperse dropper bottle.  I preferred the type not distilled by alcohol as that might effect the longevity or viability of the painting.  After much research, I chose a product called Chloro-Oxygen.  Remarkably enough this product can also be taken in water to provide healthy nutrients for the human body, just as plants!  My personal goal is to drink a glass every time I use it to create pigment.

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So, in order to capture the “pure” green and vibrant color of natural Chlorophyll, I drip one drop at a time into a small amount of clear acrylic polymer to produce light through dark green hues.  The resulting color is more vibrant that the expensive Golden colors I mainly use for the painting.  After I create the color, I slowly mix in a color, depending on what I want to achieve, such as a yellow or blue, or even white.  It is very exciting to watch what is essentially a mystery unfold.  There are times, of course where I am disappointed and those colors I turn into browns.

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Chlorophyll (also chlorophyl) is a green pigment found in almost all plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Its name is derived from the Greek words χλωρος, chloros (“green”) and φύλλον, phyllon (“leaf”). Chlorophyll is an extremely important biomolecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to obtain energy from light. Chlorophyll absorbs light most strongly in the blue portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, followed by the red portion. However, it is a poor absorber of green and near-green portions of the spectrum, hence the green color of chlorophyll-containing tissues. Chlorophyll was first isolated by Joseph Bienaimé Caventou and Pierre Joseph Pelletier in 1817.

Chlorophyll is vital for photosynthesis, which allows plants to obtain energy from light.  Chlorophyll molecules are specifically arranged in and around photosystems that are embedded in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. In these complexes, chlorophyll serves two primary functions. The function of the vast majority of chlorophyll (up to several hundred molecules per photosystem) is to absorb light and transfer that light energy by resonance energy transfer to a specific chlorophyll pair in the reaction center of the photosystems.

The two currently accepted photosystem units are Photosystem II and Photosystem I, which have their own distinct reaction center chlorophylls, named P680 and P700, respectively. These pigments are named after the wavelength (in nanometers) of their red-peak absorption maximum. The identity, function and spectral properties of the types of chlorophyll in each photosystem are distinct and determined by each other and the protein structure surrounding them. Once extracted from the protein into a solvent (such as acetone ormethanol), these chlorophyll pigments can be separated in a simple paper chromatography experiment and, based on the number of polar groups between chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, will chemically separate out on the paper.

Chlorophyll is registered as a food additive (colorant), and its E number is E140. Chefs use chlorophyll to color a variety of foods and beverages green, such as pasta and absinthe. Chlorophyll is not soluble in water, and it is first mixed with a small quantity of vegetable oil to obtain the desired solution. Extracted liquid chlorophyll was considered to be unstable and always denatured until 1997, when Frank S. & Lisa Sagliano used freeze-drying of liquid chlorophyll at the University of Florida and stabilized it as a powder, preserving it for future use.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorophyll

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The Journal of Dreams 03/14/2010

RED and the Hummingbird

It is an odd thing, life.  Never had I liked the color red much in my younger years, it was not until my older years that red best suited my need for various expression.  In The Revelation Painting, it has grown into the passion and life’s blood of the painting itself.  I found a wealth of information regarding color and the effects it has on our psychological understanding, or feelings and the impact it has that often times we are unaware of.

In researching red in business matters, I wanted to see why the Hummingbird was attracted to the red color.  I found that it is because the color shades they can see are green and red. And since most of their surroundings are green (trees) the red stands out to them.  Then I thought about business, people in general and know that often times people are overwhelmed by life and their minds mute their environment making the red attractive.

When a person is attracted to the seductive red color, maybe they cannot see the dangers or “the big picture” because the red dominates their passion and desires.  When this happens, a psychological happiness occurs and the person is left vulnerable…under the spell of red.  Walking around in a world hypnotized under a seductive “spell” could prove less than favorable and against the very grain of existence.  Remember business is a predator, it wants you!

Color Meanings in Business

 Understanding color meanings in business is essential when you are establishing a business profile. Color psychology affects our lives in so many ways, yet we often don’t realize the impact of our color choices on our website colors, on our stationery and packaging, in our retail store or office, in our marketing or our business clothing. Color has a powerful subconscious effect on every part of our lives, without even saying a word; an understanding of color meanings in business gives us an invaluable tool to get the best response to our marketing and promotional efforts and ultimately to create a successful business.

In applying the information about color meanings in business to enhance your own business profile and marketing, don’t use any color entirely on its own; it is always best to use a complementary color with your main choice as over-use of any one color can negate its effect and in fact have the opposite effect.

There is almost always more than one option of color combinations to assist your business, so you don’t have to choose any color that you do not like or resonate to. Or you may use the disliked color in a very small amount to get the response you want from your customer. For example, you may use just a very small amount of red to indicate your passion or energy for your business or as a call to action button on your website. Read all the information on each color in this ‘color meanings in business’ section to determine the best choices for your business.

Red: color meanings in business

Red is a warm and positive color, a very physical color which draws attention to itself and calls for action to be taken.

In color psychology red means energy, passion, action, strength and excitement.

Red stimulates the physical senses such as the appetite, lust and sexual passion. Although it is often used to express love, it really relates more to sexual passion and lust – pink relates more to romantic love than red.

Red represents masculine energy, whereas its softer version, pink, is associated with feminine energy.

Red, a universal sign of danger and warning, can also show and create aggressiveness and anger, particularly if used to excess in the wrong applications.

Physiologically, red stimulates and energizes the physical body, including the nerves and the circulation of blood, raising blood pressure and heart rate. It is stimulating to the appetite and therefore a great color to use for any product associated with food and its service, including restaurants and take-away businesses.

Red excites and motivates but in excess it can cause anxiety and tiredness. It also has negative connotations associated with blood, war and violence.

The color which most complements and balances red is turquoise, although green or blue will also create balance.

Key Words:

Positive Color Meanings in Business:

  • action, power, energy, speed
  • passion, desire, lust
  • strength, courage
  • attention-getting, motivating, stimulating, energizing
  • driven and determined
  • exciting, warm, spontaneous, assertive and confident

Negative Color Meanings in Business:

  • aggression and anger
  • domineering, over-bearing and tiring
  • quick-tempered, ruthless, fearful and intolerant
  • rebellious and obstinate
  • resentful, violent and brutal

Using Red in Business:

Often used as a warning sign, red is best used as an accent color as too much red can overwhelm.

Red will always elicit a passionate response but the response may be either positive or negative and you may have no control over this response as it will be in the hands of your potential customer.

Red encourages buyers to take action and make a purchase. For example, it could be used to tempt an impulse buy at the purchase counter in your store, as footprints or arrows directing people around your store or to your cash register, or for a ‘buy now’ button on a website.

A touch of red can be used as one of the colors on your website to indicate your energy and passion for your business. In larger amounts it is effective in the promotion of products or services related to food and appetite, energy, passion or speed.

http://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/color-meanings-in-business.html

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The Journal of Dreams 01/14/2010

Golden acrylics are one of the most expensive paints to paint with, so much so that I will have to find another way to create the rich texture of the sky.  I want it to rise up from the canvas at least 2mm-3mm, even 4mm of possible.  Upon working on it, it was with rapid realization that I noticed the sky requires too much paint to achieve that deep texture.  My favorite art supply store is Michaels where just about everything I need for the painting can be found there and if it is not, it can be custom ordered.  The other evening I was there, exploring my options and saw texture building mediums.  Tonight I will go there and see what I can find to build texture.

The plan is to use Van Gogh’s Starry Night technique but to an extreme.  I had read that when Van Gogh made that painting his sight was so deteriorated that the painting reflected how he had come to actually see things due to exposure from the toxic elements of the paint and pigments he used.  Paint in modern times is supposed to be free of those life altering toxins which is imperative for artist’ like me who have a very real habit of licking their paint brushes.  Further research revealed to me that the Old Master’s often times licked their brushes too.  No reason for it was found in my research but I know why I lick my brushes and probably why they did to.

Often times when painting, an artist mixes a custom color that is difficult to duplicate.  I find myself adding saliva to the brush to fade the last remaining color away.  I used the technique as a shadowing effect, especially with darker colors leaving the same color as mixed, just fading away.  I am unsure if the Old Master’s used the technique for any other purpose other than the reason I use it.  I am unsure when I started doing it, finding myself with a colored tongue is what brought it to my attention, then I realized exactly when and why I do it.

A while back I had run across an old art store going out of business.  They had some powdered pigments in the brightest oranges and yellows.  I bought them for a substantial discount.  Somehow I had looked right past the skull and crossbones on their labels as I focused on the vibrant colors.  That was about 10 years ago and I haven’t ever opened them, afraid of forgetting and licking them as it has become second nature for me.  They sit on a shelf where I admire them but am unsure of myself in the middle of painting to remember they are poison.

The Journal of Dreams 01/10/2010

I thought about yesterday’s angry blog a lot.  Sitting in my car before work, I wondered if the most successful artist were “airheads” that never made intelligent remarks or showed their true feelings about life in general.  I wondered if I am defeating myself before I even begin this new life.  I wonder about the entire world sometimes.