Category Archives: 2010 Dreams

The Measure of a Man…or Woman

Humanity may refer to:

  • The human species

The total world population

  • Human nature, psychological characteristics that all normal humans have in common

Compassion, altruism, or similar positive aspects of human nature along with aggression, fear, or similar negative aspects

  • The human condition, the totality of experience of existing as a human
  • The humanities, academic disciplines which study the human condition using analytic, critical, or speculative methods
  • The Kingdom of Humanity, a micronation.
  • Humanity as one of the six core virtues in the Character Strengths and Virtueshandbook.

The Character Strengths and Virtues (CSV) handbook of human strengths and virtues, by the Values in Action Institute, represents the first attempt on the part of the research community to identify and classify the positive psychological traits of human beings. In the same way that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is used to assess and facilitate research on mental disorders, the CSV is intended to provide a theoretical framework to assist in developing practical applications for positive psychology. The CSV identifies six classes of virtue (i.e. “core virtues”), made up of twenty-four measurable character strengths.

 

List from the book

The organization of these virtues and strengths in the book is as follows.[1]

  • Wisdom and Knowledge (strengths that involve the acquisition and use of knowledge)
    • creativity (personified for example by Albert Einstein)
    • curiosity (personified for example by John C. Lilly)
    • open-mindedness (personified for example by William James)
    • love of learning (personified for example by Benjamin Franklin)
    • perspective and wisdom (personified for example by Ann Landers): the coordination of “knowledge and experience” and “its deliberate use to improve wellbeing.”[4] Many, but not all, studies find that adults’ self-ratings of perspective/wisdom do not depend on age.[5] This stands in contrast to the popular notion that wisdom increases with age.[5]
  • Courage (strengths that allow one to accomplish goals in the face of opposition)
    • bravery (personified for example by Ernest Shackleton)
    • persistence (personified for example by John D. Rockefeller)
    • integrity (personified for example by Sojourner Truth)
    • vitality (personified for example by the Dalai Lama)
  • Humanity (strengths of tending and befriending others)
    • love (personified for example by Romeo and Juliet)
    • kindness (personified for example by Cicely Saunders)
    • social intelligence (personified for example by Robert Kennedy)
  • Justice (strengths that build healthy community)
    • active citizenship / social responsibility / loyalty / teamwork (personified for example by Sam Nzima)
    • fairness (personified for example by Mohandas Gandhi)
    • leadership
  • Temperance (strengths that protect against excess)
    • forgiveness and mercy (personified for example by Pope John Paul II)
    • humility and modesty (personified for example by Bill W., co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous)
    • prudence (personified for example by Fred Soper)
    • self-regulation and self control (personified for example by Jerry Rice)
  • Transcendence (strengths that forge connections to the larger universe and provide meaning)
    • appreciation of beauty and appreciation of excellence (personified for example by Walt Whitman)
    • gratitude (personified for example by G. K. Chesterton)
    • hope (personified for example by Martin Luther King, Jr.)
    • humor and playfulness (personified for example by Mark Twain)
    • spirituality (personified for example by Albert Schweitzer)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Character_Strengths_and_Virtues

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41°53′9.26″N 12°30′22.16″E

41°53′9.26″N 12°30′22.16″E

Working on the buildings to be used in Scene V.  It seems the architecture in the bible often refers to buildings in nearly perfect measurements.  It was odd to find that many of today’s renowned buildings are made in very similar measurements, often similar to one another.

The Most Commonly Know Structure of Vatican City

The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter (Latin: Basilica Sancti Petri), officially known in Italian as Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly known as Saint Peter’s Basilica, is a Late Renaissance church located within the Vatican City. Saint Peter’s Basilica has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world. While it is neither the official mother church of the Roman Catholic Church nor the cathedral of the Pope as Bishop of Rome, Saint Peter’s is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic sites. It has been described as “holding a unique position in the Christian world” and as “the greatest of all churches of Christendom”.

In Roman Catholic tradition, the basilica is the burial site of its namesake Saint Peter, who was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, according to tradition, the first Bishop of Rome and therefore first in the line of the papal succession. Tradition and some historical evidence hold that Saint Peter’s tombis directly below the altar of the basilica. For this reason, many Popes have been interred at St. Peter’s since the Early Christian period. There has been a church on this site since the 4th century. Construction of the present basilica, over the old Constantinian basilica, began on 18 April 1506 and was completed on 18 November 1626.

St. Peter’s is famous as a place of pilgrimage, for its liturgical functions and for its historical associations. It is associated with the papacy, with the Counter-reformation and with numerous artists, most significantly Michelangelo. As a work of architecture, it is regarded as the greatest building of its age. Contrary to popular misconception, Saint Peter’s is not a cathedral, as it is not the seat of a bishop. It is properly termed a papal basilica. The Archbasilica of St. John Lateran is the cathedral church of Rome.

VS

 

The official mother church of the Roman Catholic Church

The Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran (Italian: Arcibasilica Papale di San Giovanni in Laterano), commonly known as St. John Lateran’s Archbasilica and St. John Lateran’s Basilica, is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Bishop of Rome, who is the Pope. The official name, in Latin, is Archibasilica Sanctissimi Salvatoris et Sanctorum Iohannes Baptista et Evangelista in Laterano, which translates in English as Archbasilica of the Most Holy Saviour and Ss. John the Baptist and the Evangelist at the Lateran, and in Italian as Arcibasilica del Santissimo Salvatore e Santi Giovanni Battista ed Evangelista in Laterano.

It is the oldest and ranks first among the four Papal Basilicas or major basilicas of Rome (having the cathedra of the Bishop of Rome). It claims the title of ecumenical mother church among Roman Catholics. The current archpriest of St. John Lateran is Agostino Vallini, Cardinal Vicar General for the Diocese of Rome. The President of the French Republic, currently Nicolas Sarkozy, is ex officio the “first and only honorary canon” of the basilica, a title inherited from the Kings of France, who have held it since Henry IV of France.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_of_St._John_Lateran

MEASUREMENTS:

  • Cost of construction of the basilica = 46,800,052ducats[44]
  • Geographic orientation = chancel west, nave east
  • Capacity = 60,000 +[citation needed]
  • Total length = 730 feet (220 m)
  • Total width = 500 feet (150 m)
  • Interior length incl. vestibule = 693.8 feet (211.5 m),[4]more than 1/8 mile.
  • Length of the transepts in interior = 451 feet (137 m)[4]
  • Width of nave = 90.2 feet (27.5 m)[4]
  • Width at the tribune = 78.7 feet (24.0 m)[4]
  • Internal width at transepts = 451 feet (137 m)[4]
  • Internal height of nave = 151.5 feet (46.2 m) high[4]
  • Total area = 227,070 square feet (21,095 m2), more than 5 acres (20,000 m2).
  • Internal area = 163,182.2 square feet (3.75 acres; 15,160.12 m2)[4]
  • Height from pavement to top of cross = 452 feet (138 m)
  • Façade = 167 feet (51 m) high by 375 feet (114 m) wide
  • Vestibule = 232.9 feet (71.0 m) feet wide, 44.2 feet (13.5 m) deep, and 91.8 feet (28.0 m) high[4]
  • The internal columns and pilasters = 92 feet (28 m) tall
  • The circumference of the central piers = 240 feet (73 m)
  • Outer diameter of dome = 137.7 feet (42.0 m)[4]
  • The drum of the dome = 630 feet (190 m) in circumference and 65.6 feet (20.0 m) high, rising to 240 feet (73 m) from the ground
  • The lantern = 63 feet (19 m) high
  • The ball and cross = 8 and 16 feet (2.4 and 4.9 m), respectively
  • St. Peter’s Square = 1,115 feet (340 m) long, 787.3 feet (240.0 m) wide[4]
  • Each arm of the colonnade = 306 feet (93 m) long, and 64 feet (20 m) high
  • The colonnades have 248 columns, 88 pilasters, and 140 statues[4]
  • Obelisk = 83.6 feet (25.5 m). Total height with base and cross, 132 feet (40 m).
  • Weight of obelisk = 360.2 short tons (326,800 kg; 720,400 lb)[4]

Length 140 metres (460 ft)

Width 140 metres (460 ft

Width 65 metres (213 ft)

41°53′9.26″N12°30′22.16″E

Secret #2

Making of The Black Horse and His Eye

In the beginning of the making of the Black Horse the difficulty was nearly so much that I felt I would give up at any time.  There are 40 horses overlapped, one upon the other in search of the horse in my mind, within my imagination.  I have learned that the 40 horses are those of battle, my battle in learning to paint a horse.  Even now as he nears completion, he is not the original horse in my mind, the one turned more toward the viewer with flared nostrils filled with morning dew breathing the crisp fog when hot energetic air meets the cooled air of the morning.  The difficulty is mainly in my deficit regarding painting a horse. As an “artist” I find myself unprepared although I have imprinted images of some of the most magnificent horses in the world within my own mind.  One day the virtual world will bring what is in the mind to canvas but until that day it is the hand which projects what rest within the mind’s eye.

You have heard me rant about time being the enemy which is an obsession of mine but in this case, time helped me to see the error of my ways.  In the moments of time, while I looked relentlessly at the horse, I began to see that not only is he a main focal point of the entire painting, but also that his eye was placed awkwardly and anatomically wrong in the painting.   Oddly enough over the years, no one else had noticed it either, or if they did they did not dare speak of it.  Artist respect may have played a significant role in no one mentioning what they saw or prehaps didn’t see at all.  As many photos and live horses I had looked at, somehow I did not see it either.  There was a specific plan for that eye for that past couple of years and that could have easily pulled my attention away from it until the day I finally brought to life the image of the secret I had planned.  As Mona Lisa is known from being DaVinci in feminine form, the eye is mine.

The Journal of Dreams 01/31/2010 Experiment

Today has been filled with crushing rainbow quartz.  It has been a hard job but very good for anger management!  There is a lot of white powder residual I will have to sift out.  The goal is to leave only the sparkling shards.  Remarkably I have not received any cuts on my fingers yet which was an expectation since it is like glass once it is broken up.

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The effect is not what I imagined.  I wanted all the colors of the rainbow to easily be seen.  This is not astounding and dramatic.  By adding hologram glitter, the effect is almost there but if I have to use the hologram glitter to get the effect, what is the point of crushing the rainbow quartz?  The effect of rainbow quartz is definitely best see by leaving it intact.

Ideally I need a sheet of rainbow quartz fiber optically lit from the back illuminating the rainbow by movement of the lights.  The sheet of quartz would have to be so thin that the weight of itself would break it.  I wonder what the price of a 48″ x 48″ piece would be?  I am still unsure if that would be the effect I am dreaming of.  I think I will look for hologram flakes, if there is such a thing.

I have to sit down and quietly imagine how to separate the sparkle of God from the “sea of glass-like fine crystal” in front of the throne since both are similar in appearance.  This is going to be another hard section to create.  Even though I anticipated glitches here and there, this section of the painting is extremely complicated and requires true imagination.

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